This is default featured slide 1 title
This is default featured slide 3 title
 

Monthly Archives: August 2018

Banner Design Techniques

Simple integrated design

When Larry Page and Sergey Brin first introduced their product, “Google”, to potential investors, they mentioned AdWords as a backup option in case they didn’t make any money. We all know how lucky they were that they eventually needed to use that backup plan. What made these “boring” ads such a great success?

Unlike other ads, AdWords neither arouse the visitor’s curiosity nor disturb the main flow of the web page. In fact, the opposite is true. AdWords are meant to look like part of the search results giving the user the feeling that those ads are there because he asked for them. No one has any doubt that this simple design helps Google to promote both their search engine and the AdWords advertising program.

Take part in the action

Banner designers wisely used interactive technologies like Flash to develop type of banners that invite the user to take part in the action. Drawing the user into the action can be accomplished in many creative ways. Some web designers use popular old games elements as part of the scene. You all know the famous game pacman. One of the banners that I like the most is the one where the user is allowed to let pacman “eat” few dollar signs. At the successful completion of this mission, a nice slogan is revealed asking him to open a saving account that will earn money with a fixed interest rate. The idea behind those interactive banners is simple: Let the user take part in the action and then at the right moment when his mind is less resistant, show him the sales message. Those interactive banners proved to be very efficient. Their biggest disadvantage is that most webmasters will not allow that kind of banner because it distracts too much from the web page content.

Back to Black and White

Website designers are always seeking to be different with their design ideas. One banner fashion trend that can be found lately is Black and White banners. Although research shows that blue and yellow are the most efficient color to use in a banner, Black and White banners have been seen a lot lately. It’s probably something that will eventually vanish, but the idea behind it is to be different and to make the user wonder what’s up and hopefully click on the banner to find out.

Get Out of the box

Have you heard about the milliondollarhomepage.com? If not, check out this website before continuing to read this article. This website has proven that creative thinking not only can bring you money but also create a whole new trend. Right after the milliondollarhomepage.com got the internet community’s attention, many designers used this idea to deign a banner on which they sell a 10×10 pixel area. Like the original concept, this banner design had its impact. Advertisers are investing money on these ad spaces while at the same time visitors are curious enough time after time looking at those unorganized pixel banners to click on them.

What about the next trends

What the next trends of banner design will be is something that probably no one can accurately predict. It’s up to some web designer to come up with a new concept that proves to be efficient. There is no doubt that in the future we will see new ways of designing banners, especially when more and more advertising budgets are being spent on the internet instead of commercial TV and other types of advertising media. I guess we will just need to be patient.

Design for Speed

Tables are frequently used among web designers for creating an attractive and effective site. However, rarely do web designers create new tables for the different segments of their content. Instead, they simply divide the cells into which they will be placing their content – the lazy road. While this may work very well if there are very few images – or no images at all – on your website, if this is not the case, then you will only be convincing your visitors to leave before they’ve even touched what your site has to offer them.

If your site has several images or is quite intense in its graphic usage, consider using separate tables for dividing your content. The reasons for this are many, but straightforward.

The first reason you should split your content among several tables can be explained by understanding the way that internet browsers read tables in a web site. Within a standard HTML site, the browser will display the text and the images as they load. However, when tables come into play, the browser will wait until the entire page has loaded before any of its contents are displayed within your visitor’s internet browser. All that is required is one large graphic to slow down the display of your entire site from within fifteen seconds to over a minute. Therefore, it is for precisely this reason that you should use separate tables to split your graphics from other elements of your site. Simply format the border, cell spacing, and cell padding at 0 so that the multiple tables are not visible to your viewers.

Using two or more tables is among the best ways to split up all of the data on your web site. The first table may consist of your logo and any header information that you wish to include in your web design. A second table can be the actual content of the site. If your page happens to be especially big, a third table can be added, for example for a particularly large graphic or other sizeable element.

This usually works quite well as the visitor will immediately be able to see your logo and some of the options offered by your web site as they wait for the rest of the page’s content to load.

You can also choose to split up your content by creating tables within your tables. This will allow the main table to load first, displaying its own contents while the tables within it continue to load. This makes the loading time of your page notably faster, and still provides the viewer with something to look at and read as the page’s sub-tables continue to load.

As an additional note, to continue to save on loading time, it is discouraged that you should use elements such as Java, Shockwave, and ActiveX programs within your tables. Instead, use JavaScript within your web page tables as it is much faster in its loading and its execution.

These techniques are highly valued by web designers who prioritize fast loading websites, and who understand how important it is to get your content in front of your visitors as quickly as possible in order to discourage them from going elsewhere to find a faster site.

Whenever possible, consider your visitors with slower connections – such as dial up – and test the speed of your site before finalizing its web design. Remember that most visitors find it much easer and much more appealing to simply click away from a slow site and find a fast one than to wait forever for a sluggish load. The rule of thumb is to have your first information up within 10 seconds for even the slowest connections, and then build rapidly from there, providing additional information and content before the viewer can become bored or frustrated.

Design for Web Content

The most important part of your website is the content itself. You have something to say, and you must make sure you say it, or all your effort has been wasted. But there’s no point in just regurgitating a few paragraphs of marketing hype – web users are surprisingly savvy, and they can see through that in an instant; an instant in which they will have hit the back button and moved on down the list of search results.

You need to find out what people are looking for, and give it to them.

Do some research; think about which terms you would use to search if you wanted to buy your product, and then look them up. Have a look at who your competitors are, and what they are doing. Research on Wordtracker and see if there are any other keywords you could try.

Then use your imagination. Think about why people might be looking for your product and write for them. If your site advertises a skiing hotel in Switzerland, don’t just advertise for ‘hotels in Switzerland’, provide useful articles about skiing, and then point them to your hotel in the middle of a ski resort.

When you know what content you require, you need to write it. The key to this is that it must be written well – you want people to read it and find the information useful. There’s a lot of rubbish out there, and if people find a genuinely useful article they will remember it and come back for more. With that in mind, here are a few ideas for writing better content:

  • Write clearly. Write succinctly. People get turned off by huge blocks of text, so keep it as short and sweet as possible.
  • Don’t feel you have to explain every little thing, but don’t assume that your readers know everything that you do. If they did, they wouldn’t be reading your article.
  • Use references to strengthen your arguments, and link to sources where people can get more information. Don’t be afraid to link to sites other than your own. It will only make people trust you more.
  • Talk as yourself. It’s the web; you can and should be informal. People like feeling that they are listening to a real human being. However, that doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t use correct spelling, punctuation and grammar.
  • Don’t overuse colloquialisms – not everybody is from the same country as you, and it’s easy for things to get lost in translation.

For more information, have a look at our article about optimising your site for the web [http://www.herdsofwords.co.uk/articles/optimise.html].

Design for ease of use

People don’t like reading as much text on a screen as on a page. Therefore, you must make things easy for them. Design your website to complement and enhance the text, and be careful not to overwhelm it with fancy menus and images that distract your readers from the important stuff: your content.

Split the text into easily digestible chunks; use short paragraphs made up of short sentences. Give each topic its own separate page if it makes things easier to read. Five concise pages are better than one single sprawling mass of text.

Use bullet points and lists to make things simpler. Emphasise important things using header tags or bold to make them stand out. Basically, try to break things up as much as possible into smaller sections that people will be more inclined to read.

Web Design Usability

1. Set goals and know understand the objective of your web design

What is it trying to achieve?

Wow the audiences?

Design a simple web user interface?

2. Design Consistency

Many web pages has more than 10 types of fonts with 20 types of sizes. Ever seen this type of web design?

Use CSS to help maintain a consistency through out your web design.

3. Font Type

Use readable font for your audiences. After all, you are trying to let your audiences understand about this web site that you have designed.

4. Important information at the top of the page

While if important words are positioned at the top of web pages, it helps in SEO, this is not the main factor. You want to convey your message immediately when the page loads.

5. Links

Make sure your links is clearly visible. Do not use the same text and font and color for links.